UK will have ‘less strategic importance’ to US if No-Deal Brexit goes ahead – Biden latest

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But according to one expert, no-deal could have catastrophic consequences for the UK and render it “less strategically important” to its ally across the Atlantic. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has insisted the likelihood of a deal being made depends entirely on the EU. Speaking on Friday ahead of talks resuming, the Prime Minister said “there’s a deal to be done if they want to do it”, but added “substantial and important differences” remained between the two sides, with just over one month left to finalise an exit agreement.

Speaking to Express.co.uk, Schillings partner and former Deputy Homeland Security Adviser to the Barack Obama administration, Amy Pope said a no-deal Brexit wouldn’t fare well when it comes to US-UK relations going forward.

Ms Pope said: “For many decades, the UK has been a bridge between the US and the rest of Europe – sharing a point of view when it comes to information and intelligence sharing, defence and security.

“That position has been upended as a result of the UK’s decision to leave the EU and it is clear the UK will have less strategic importance to the United States as a result.”

President-elect Joe Biden is a long-standing Brexit-sceptic, believing the EU to be one of the world’s most advanced trading blocs.

Consequently, President Biden is very sceptical of the UK’s decision to exit, contrary to Donald Trump who openly expressed support for Britain’s departure from Europe.

Mr Biden has also expressed anger towards the UK in recent months when he tweeted a stark warning to the Government in regards to the controversial Internal Market Bill and its potential effect on the situation in Ireland.

The President-elect tweeted: “We can’t allow the Good Friday Agreement that brought peace to Northern Ireland become a casualty of Brexit.

“Any trade deal between the US and UK must be contingent upon respect for the Agreement and preventing the return of a hard border. Period.”

Ms Pope said: “If there is no deal, President-Elect Biden has made it clear that his primary concern is protecting the Good Friday Agreement that brought peace to Northern Ireland.

“If that agreement is not honoured, it will be difficult for the UK to secure a favourable trade deal with the United States.

“It will undermine the UK’s relationship with the US on a broader scale.”

The Internal Market Bill has been very controversial, especially after having been found to break some aspects of international law.

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The Bill received much criticism domestically after ministers admitted it had “damaged our reputation around the world”.

Former prime minister John Major said: “At a moment when we need to maximise our commercial activities, this bill has had a corrosive impact on the reputation of English and Welsh jurisdiction.

“This may have a practical cost. International dispute resolution can be conducted anywhere overseas and the bill could erode the present pre-eminent position of the UK and, perhaps, especially London.”

As it stands, all living former Prime Ministers have spoken out in criticism of the new legislation.

But according to Ms Pope, it’s not all bad news for Britain even if a no-deal Brexit goes ahead.

She added: “While a no-deal Brexit would be damaging to the UK economically, the overall political ramifications would be balanced by a multitude of geo-political factors.

“No matter the deal that the UK strikes with the EU, the UK will still have a meaningful role to play with respect to any number of factors playing out on the global stage.

“It depends more on its [Britain’s] ability to look outward and move beyond Brexit.”

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