UK hot weather: Britons to bake in 86F scorcher in DAYS as African plume bakes London

BBC Weather forecasts mixed conditions with threat of thunder

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After two months of record-breaking heat, England has nine areas officially in a drought. While some rainfall is forecast for the weekend to come, and the week ahead is cooler than the heights of August, the bank holiday weekend is set to see a return to temperatures in the high 20C’s and even 30C (86F).

Maps from WXCharts see that from midday on Monday temperatures will start to climb towards the August Bank Holiday.

Thursday sees the highest temperatures at 6pm, where the south east and London bake in heat between 24C and 26C.

At this time, a north and south split emerges, with Scotland, Northern Ireland and parts of north England seeing low pressure from Greenland causing temperatures to fall between 12C to 16C.

While milder, the trend continues into Friday, with south England seeing mid 20C weather and the north of Britain seeing men colder conditions at 11C.

British Weather Services senior meteorologist Jim Dale says temperatures could reach the high twenties by the end of August.

Mr Dale told Express.co.uk: “As it looks from the models now, around the bank holiday temperatures could be in the high 20s and the extreme would be 30C degrees.

“The southern areas might see 25C, 26C, 27C degrees and the odd 28C 29C, with the extreme getting to 30C degrees.”

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In the Met Office’s outlook from August 23 to September 1, they said: “The very start of this period will see most areas experiencing rather cloudy conditions and perhaps some rain or drizzle spreading from the southwest.

“The east and southeast are more likely to be drier on Tuesday, with stronger winds and showers in the north and northwest. From then, there looks to be a change to more settled conditions with the best of any sunshine in the southeast.

“A northwest/southeast temperature split may also develop, whereby cooler polar air will characterise the north, with the south experiencing warmer air from the continent.

“By the end of this period, fine, dry weather is likely to prevail for many. Light winds are likely with plenty of sunshine, and temperatures generally warm or locally very warm.”

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Jo Farrow, Netweather.tv forecaster, also wrote for the agency’s website the end of the week to come will see “low pressures whizzing in from the Atlantic and seemingly lined up to pass over the UK”.

She added: “Pressure slowly rises over the UK next week This will bring drier than average weather to NW UK. The Atlantic jet helps various low pressures affect our UK weather.

“It has been windy for Scotland and Northern Ireland midweek and these low pressures will keep the blustery weather into early next week.

“Things settle as the jet weakens and high pressure tries to build. That could bring more settled weather for the late August Bank Holiday weekend.

“Signs of fine weather, light winds, some warmth but not a guarantee of completely dry weather.”

Meanwhile, despite rain and thunderstorms throughout the last week, a drought has been declared in parts of Wales.

Natural Resources Wales (NRW) said the threshold to trigger drought status in south-west Wales was met on Friday.

The areas affected include North Ceredigion, Teifi, Pembrokeshire, Carmarthen, Swansea, Llanelli, Neath Port Talbot and Bridgend.

In England, Devon and Cornwall, Solent and South Downs, Kent and south London, Herts and north London, East Anglia, Thames, Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire, Yorkshire and the east Midlands are in a drought.

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