Miss England swaps catwalk for Covid lab as she leads the fight to protect kids

A former Miss England has proved she’s not just a pretty face as she’s leading the fight in helping protect kids against new strains of coronavirus.

Stunning scientist Stephanie Hill has swapped the catwalk for the Covid lab as she works with a team desperately battling to protect children from the killer disease.

The beauty queen – who was crowned Miss England in 2017 – now happily dons a white coat rather than a bikini as she carries out ground breaking research.

The brainbox has recently graduated as a Masters of Science on January 14 – just months after her pageant success.

Her role as a pediatric researcher involves vital investigating on new strains of Covid and how they might affect children – and crucially, how scientist might be able to beat it.

She said: “My daily life is spent in a lab coat or a nursing tunic.

“I can’t have makeup on in the lab, and I need comfy shoes, not high heels.

“I was pleasantly surprised when my colleagues found out the pageants as they already understood how it all works.

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“They were very accepting and have never treated me any differently.

“They think it is really good that I am using the platform to break stereotypes.

“I am showing people that you don’t have to be a straight-A student or a ‘boffin’ to be a scientist and anyone can do it.”

Stephanie enjoys her role on the frontline but misses pageants.

She has made it her priority to help tackle the virus so she can step back on stage for the third time.

She said: “I’m a former Miss World Europe, Miss United Kingdom and Miss England 2017, and I’m currently competing for the title of Miss Universe Great Britain with the hopes of representing Great Britain at Miss Universe.

“My current position is working in clinical trials to deliver novel therapeutics to paediatric patients; however my main workload is focusing on COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2 clinical trials, assessing how the virus behaves in asymptomatic children and young adults.

“The infection is severe but I have great hope that all the hard work is going to pay off.

“We are so busy but not half as busy as those who work on the wards.

“I hope things will be safer by spring.

“Without focusing on the future too much, I am so excited for pageants and normality in general to return.

Stephanie hopes people are staying safe to help keep the virus under control.

She adds: “I am trying to prioritise people’s health and safety over everything else.

“I hope everyone is treating each other with compassion during these tough times. “

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