Drug cartel bosses ‘trained ruthless Albanian gangs to flood UK with cocaine

Albanian gangs that have flooded the UK with cocaine and other Class A drugs learned the tricks of the trade from cartel bosses in South America, an expert has claimed.

The anonymous expert said that UK based gangs made up of Albanian men sent out “ambassadors” to live in Mexico and Columbia permanently in order to keep the supply of cocaine flowing into the UK and Europe.

“Their relationship is successful. Despite some murders, it has been very successful”, they told the Sun.

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“It’s a solid and well-established connection between the Albanians and the cartels."

“The fact we see a lot of shipments arriving in Europe which the Albanians have got control of shows it is up and running.

The gangs expert said the Albanian presence in South America began when members migrated to Italy after the fall of communism in the eastern European country in 1992.

It was there they learned that Italian mafias had strong connections with south American drug cartels, before moving over in the late 2000s to forge their own relationships.

The “ambassadors” agree deals between the gangs and the cartels, including quantities and costs, and organise the trafficking of the drugs to Europe.

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The expert said that Albanian gangs were able to dominate the drugs market across Britain and Europe once this network was set up, giving them the ability to price out other gangs and sell more drugs.

Albanian gangs are now so well-established that they act as the floodgates for drugs in Britain, they said, sending shipments and then supplying them to other British gangs.

The Office of National Statistics reported that one in 11 adults between 16 and 59 in the UK had reported using drugs at least once between June 2021 and June 2022.

The percentage of UK adults who reported using Class A drugs at least once in their life has nearly doubled since 1995.

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