Furious Strugeon uses Boris party for new Indy demand Utter contempt for Scotland

Anne Widdecombe discusses Sturgeon's referendum 'U-turn'

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Nicola Sturgeon said Boris Johnson and the Westminster establishment had shown “utter contempt for Scotland” after the Prime Minister admitted to attending a party at Number 10 during lockdown. Ms Sturgeon made yet another case for Scottish independence as she cited the lack of “respect” shown to Scottish Conservatives leader Douglas Ross as a reason for the nation to leave the UK. Mr Ross was dismissed as a “lightweight” after urging the Prime Minister to resign following his apology to the nation.

Speaking at First Minister’s Questions, Ms Sturgeon said: “We’ve seen the big political differences with Douglas Ross but even I am not as derogatory about him as his own Tory colleagues are being.

|’Not a big figure,”lightweight’, these might be personal insults directed at the leader of the Scottish Conservatives but actually this says something much deeper about the Westminster’s establishment utter contempt for Scotland.

“They can’t even show basic respect for their own colleagues, what chance do the rest of us have?

“Westminster thinks Scotland doesn’t need to be listened to, can be ignored.”

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The Scottish First Minister continued: “And now we’re being told we have to hold a Prime Minister his own colleagues think is not fit for office.

“Independence is fundamentally about empowerment and aspiration but an added benefit of being independent is we’ll no longer have to put up with being treated like something on the sole of Westminster’s shoe.

“And I suspect today even Douglas Ross finds that a really attractive proposition.”

Douglas Ross faced an attack on his position within the party from the leader of the House of Commons, Jacob Rees-Mogg, after he urged the Prime Minister to consider his position.

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Mr Rees-Mogg defended Boris Johnson and hit out at Mr Ross, telling the BBC’s Newsnight programme the Scottish leader was “quite a lightweight figure” in the Conservative Party.

Speaking before entering Holyrood’s debating chamber for FMQs, Mr Ross said: “Jacob Rees-Mogg, as anyone, is entitled to their opinions. I don’t have to agree with them.”

He added: “My message is I’m going to hold the First Minister to account and ensure that Scottish Conservatives continue to provide a real alternative here in Scotland.”

A spokesman for the Scottish Conservatives insisted the party has “nothing to say about Mr Rees-Mogg”, but former MSP Adam Tomkins insisted he was “wrong” to brand Mr Ross a “lightweight” – describing it as “very rude and dismissive”.

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Former MSP Adam Tomkins said Mr Rees-Mogg was “wrong” to make such comments – which he described as “very rude and dismissive”, adding that some “serious thinking” will need to be done in Scotland about the links between the parties on either side of the border.

“There’s a ‘Save Boris’ operation going on at the moment, which you would expect Jacob Rees-Mogg to be… at the head of. That explains why Jacob Rees-Mogg was very rude and dismissive about Douglas yesterday,” Mr Tomkins said on the BBC’s Good Morning Scotland programme.

“Jacob’s got this wrong – I don’t agree with anything that Jacob said about this matter.

“Douglas is a man of principle and a man of steel, and he will lead the Scottish Conservatives in the direction he thinks he needs to lead them in order to secure that credible fighting voice for centre-right ideas in Scottish politics.”

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